the online magazine about life as a creative process

 

Haiku, Haibun & Haiga

   

 

     
 

See, below, definitions for haiku, haibun and haiga


- My Very Own Beat Scene, A haibun by Ray Rasmussen (1/08)
- What Are You Up To?, A haibun by Ray Rasmussen (10/07)
- Caught Out, A haibun by Ray Rasmussen (7/07)
- Warmth, A haibun by Ray Rasmussen (4/07)
- Hammockman, A haiga by Ray Rasmussen (4/07)
- The Storyteller, A haibun by Ray Rasmussen (1/07)
- Catalogue, A haibun by Ray Rasmussen (10/06)
- Vista, A haibun by Ray Rasmussen (7/06)
- Sunny Side, A haibun by Ray Rasmussen (4/06)
- Birch Lake, A haibun by Ray Rasmussen (1/06)
- Birthday Musings, A haibun by Ray Rasmussen (11/05)
- My Last Class, A haibun by Ray Rasmussen (9/05)
- Chest Pains, A haibun by Ray Rasmussen (7/05)
- Dover Beach aka My Back Yard A haibun by Ray Rasmussen (5/05)
- The Bamboo Rake A haibun by Ray Rasmussen (3/05)
- Cyber Café A haibun by Ray Rasmussen (1/05)
- Moving Day A haibun by Ray Rasmussen (11/04)
- The Moonlit Trail A haibun by Ray Rasmussen (9/04)
- Red Man Ruin A haibun by Ray Rasmussen (7/04)
- Clearing Out the Office A haibun by Ray Rasmussen (6/04)
- The Bathrobe A haibun by Ray Rasmussen (5/04)
- April A haibun by Ray Rasmussen (4/04)
- The Advent of Spring A haibun by Ray Rasmussen (3/04)
- The Weight of Snow A haibun by Ray Rasmussen (2/04)
- Haiku and meditation Part 3 by Ray Rasmussen (12/03)
- Haiku and meditation Part 2 by Ray Rasmussen (11/03)
- Haiku and meditation Part 1 by Ray Rasmussen (10/03)
- Summer haiku by Susan Rudnick (8/03)
- June haiku by Susan Rudnick (6/03)
- Spring haiku by Susan Rudnick (4/03)
- Winter haiku by Susan Rudnick (3/03)


Haiku

Haiku are short, non-rhyming poems
that describe a moment fully lived.
Whenever we take the time to slow down
and become present to ourselves
and our surroundings,
the possibility of a "haiku moment "
presents itself.

That "moment" forms the substance of the haiku.


Haibun

Haibun involves prose plus haiku. Haibun was originated by a Japanese monk pen-named Basho who kept journals on his extensive wanderings through Japan in the 17th century (Basho, "Narrow Road to the Interior."). As practiced today, haibun is a type of autobiographical prose combined with haiku poetry. It is focused on everyday experiences, the personal journey of life, and not just on nature themes. The haibun prose style is terse, does not follow typical rules of grammar (sometimes even verbs are omitted) and is imagistic - focused on description. The haiku does not simply repeat the prose content, but may allude to it indirectly.


Haiga

Haiga involves haiku plus images. Traditional Japanese haiga involved brush art work coupled with a haiku poem done in brush calligraphy. Like haiku poetry, the haiga art emphasizes simplicity of expression.

Modern haiga forms practiced both in the West and in Japan include photo-haiku [haiku attached to a photographic image], digital-art haiga, and all modern forms of art coupled with haiku. And, traditional brushwork haiga is still practiced in Japan and the West.

In the West, there is some controversy over what represents legitimate haiku and haiga. Some suggest that the haiku can simply deepen or enhance elements of the haiku; for example a haiku referencing a peony might be represented by an image of a peony. Others suggest that the image must not simply replicate the haiku, or put another way, that the haiku must not simply describe the image. This school believes that there should be a juxtaposition between haiku and image--a not immediately clear association of two things, one visually expressed, the other expressed in words. On this website, Ray Rasmussen has represented some of the Japanese Masters with his digital images. Some of the images closely mirror a theme or image in the haiku; others offer juxtapositions. See also:
- Japanese poets
- contemporary Western haiga practitioners

 
     
 

 

LifeSherpaŽ is a registred trademark.


© All work on this site is copyrighted - Demystifying mindfulness - Mindful Pause - Mindful listening - 1-minute mindfulness exercise - Relational mindfulness